Regina 306.359.3277 ph 

2190 Victoria Ave E

Moose Jaw 306.691.3277 ph

7B Thatcher Dr E

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There are sooo many hearing ‘myths’ floating around the internet that we could spend hours debunking them.  For example, Myth: My hearing loss is normal for my age.  Isn’t this a strange way to look at things? Do you realize that well-meaning doctors tell this to their patients every day? It also happens to be “normal” for overweight people to have high blood pressure. That doesn’t mean they should not receive treatment for the problem.  Let's address a few of the more common myths and questions:

Myth:

If I had a hearing loss, my family doctor would have told me.

Fact:

Not true! Only 14% of physicians routinely screen for hearing loss during a physical. Since most people with hearing impairments hear well in a quiet environment like a doctor's office, it can be virtually impossible for your physician to recognize the extent of your problem. Without special training, and an understanding of the nature of hearing loss, it may be difficult for your doctor to even realize that you have a hearing problem.

(betterhearing.org)

Question:

Is it true that the invisible hearing aids worn in the ear are the best hearing aids to purchase?

Answer:

There are several styles of hearing aids, and all are “state of the art.” What is most important is that you purchase a hearing aid that accommodates your hearing loss and your listening needs. Just because your friend uses a particular hearing aid style does not mean you have to (or should) use that style. Your friend's style of hearing aid may be a totally inappropriate prescription for your needs.

(asha.org)

Myth:

The consequences of hiding hearing loss are better than wearing hearing aids.

Fact:

What price are you paying for vanity? Untreated hearing loss is far more noticeable than hearing aids. If you miss a punch line to a joke, or respond inappropriately in conversation, people may have concerns about your mental acuity, your attention span or your ability to communicate effectively. The personal consequences of vanity can be life altering. At a simplistic level, untreated hearing loss means giving up some of the pleasant sounds you used

to enjoy. At a deeper level, vanity could severely reduce the quality of your life.

(betterhearing.org)

Question:

Will wearing a hearing aid further damage your hearing?

Answer:

A properly fitted and maintained hearing aid will not damage your hearing.

(asha.org)

Myth:

"I've got a milder hearing loss and therefore it is not bad enough for a hearing aid. Only people with serious hearing loss need hearing aids"

Fact:

The need for hearing amplification is dependent on your lifestyle, your need for refined hearing, and the degree of your hearing loss. If you are a lawyer, teacher or a group psychotherapist, where very refined hearing is necessary to discern the nuances of human communication, then even a mild hearing loss can be intolerable. If you live in a rural area by yourself and seldom socialize, then perhaps you are someone who is tolerant of even moderate hearing losses.  Everyone's hearing loss and listening needs are different. By working with your audiologist, you can determine if a hearing aid is needed and how much it will improve your hearing.

(betterhearing.org & asha.org)

Question:

Why do hearing aids cost so much?

Hearing aid pricing includes the cost of the device itself as well as the services from the professional.  Much of the cost in manufacturing hearing aids is from the research needed to continue making technological advancements each year. Each year, hundreds of millions of dollars are spent by the industry to improve how these devices perform. This investment back into research ultimately benefits the person with hearing loss.  When you purchase a hearing aid, the price often includes all of the professional services that go along with the fitting. Fitting hearing aids is a process that begins with a hearing evaluation and continues throughout the lifetime of the hearing aid. Your hearing ability may change, your hearing aid may need repair and you may have questions from time to time that you need answered. Keep in mind that you are making an investment in the professional, as well as the hearing aid technology.  Here’s another way to think about the price of hearing aids. Consider that an average pair of hearing aids run around $4800 for the set and have a life expectancy of about five years. If you break it down you'll find the hearing aids will cost you $960 per year, $80 per month or $2.66 per day. In other words, while the initial amount sounds high, the ongoing usage price is reasonable. Monthly, it is about what you would pay to get satellite or cable television. Daily, it’s less than the cost of a mocha at your favorite coffee shop. When you consider the communication, social, relationship and health benefits that you get from wearing a hearing aid, most people agree that it is well worth it.

(healthyhearing.com)

At the end of the day, hearing aids are an important purchase. You will always have to weigh the potential benefits with the costs associated with them, but it's crucial to think of how they'll positively impact your quality of life. The professionals at Eastside Audiology will walk you through every stage of the journey from the initial diagnosis, through the selection process, and through the lifetime maintenance of the aids.  You will always have multiple options to best combine your technology needs with financial responsibility, in a non-threatening non-commission environment.  We encourage family members to come to the appointments and, as always, we encourage lots of questions.  We are all about educating our patients.  This is all about you

Answer:

Hearing aids are not fitted based on the degree of hearing loss necessarily, but on the degree of hurt—and only when that hurt is great enough, whether socially, economically, financially, or psychologically, does this individual become a candidate for hearing aids.

(Staab, 1968).

Myth:

"I'll just have some minor surgery like my friend did, and then my hearing will be okay."

Fact:

Many people know someone whose hearing improved after medical or surgical treatment. It's true that some types of hearing loss can be successfully treated. With adults, unfortunately, this only applies to 5-10% of cases.

(betterhearing.org)